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The Haarlem Shipwreck (1647) explores the events which led to the establishment of Cape Town

The Haarlem Shipwreck (1647) explores the story around one of the earliest recorded maritime accidents in Table Bay. In this gripping investigation, based on detailed archival research, Bruno Werz chronicles the demise of the ship, and the sojourn of 62 of its survivors on the shores of the bay.

These events, seemingly inauspicious, led to the establishment five years later of the Dutch East India Company refreshment station along the trade route, and from these pragmatic arrangements grew the settlement of Cape Town, to become the ‘Mother City’ of the present-day multiracial and multicultural society of South Africa.

This superbly researched book promises to be a source publication with a difference. Readers view transcriptions in 17th-century Dutch of original VOC manuscripts (with translations): such as the survivors muster roll, and letters dispatched with a visiting English ship, the Sun.

The prize document of the collection is the hitherto unpublished journal kept by junior merchant Leendert Jansz while stranded on the shores of Table Bay, freshly capturing impressions of the people and surroundings untrammelled by the long telescope of our subsequent experience of history.

Dr Bruno Werz, FSA, is a leading authority on maritime archaeology and history. His projects include underwater excavations of the VOC ships Oosterland and Waddinxveen (1697) in Table Bay, an extensive survey of sunken ships around Robben Island, and the excavation of sub-Saharan Africa’s earliest shipwreck near Oranjemund, Namibia. He is the discoverer of the world’s oldest artefacts from under the sea. Werz has lectured and published widely and is a member of the Royal Society of South Africa and other professional organisations. He was elected a Fellow of the prestigious Society of Antiquaries of London in recognition of his achievements. Werz is currently research co-operator for the Department of Historical and Heritage Studies of the University of Pretoria and Chief Executive Officer of the African Institute for Marine and Underwater Research, Exploration and Education (AIMURE: http://www.aimure.org).

Table of content
Illustrations vii

Acknowledgements ix

CHAPTER 1: Introduction 1

CHAPTER 2:

Historical background 5

Northwestern Europe during the mid-seventeenth century

The Cape of Good Hope

The VOC, its ships and life on board

A brief history of the Haarlem and the events of 1647–1648

CHAPTER 3:

The documents 31

The journal of Leendert Jansz and related documents

The Remonstrantie, Jan van Riebeeck’s Closer consideration and the instructions for the commanding

officers of the ships Dromedaris, Reiger and Goede Hoop.

Comparisons between the archival information and the secondary literature

CHAPTER 4:

Historical-archaeological research 43

Dawn of the Haarlem project

The development of a framework

Surveying of the presumed site

The 1995 archaeological investigation and later surveys

CHAPTER 5: Conclusions 61

CHAPTER 6: Transcripts and English translations of the documents 65

Sources 157

Index

Book details

The latest contribution to The Road to Democracy series analyses commemorations and memorialisations of the Soweto uprisings

The Road to Democracy Volume 7 - Soweto Uprisings: New Perspective, Commemorations and MemorialisatiThis latest contribution to The Road to Democracy series deftly analyses commemorations and memorialisations of the 1976 uprisings in Soweto. Voices of authorities, police and veterans of the struggle are shared through collective memories, eyewitness accounts, and oral history testimonies.

These voices, and the experiences of activists, participants and observers of the uprisings, provide readers with a palpable and arresting ‘truth’ more compelling than that of a dispassionate history text.

This volume, the seventh in the series, postulates that history is about change at a given time: while pursuing a fragile balance between partisanship and objectivity, history is open to continuous reassessment and reappraisal, revision and re-examination, construction and reconstruction.

This volume, rooted as it is in primary evidence and archival material, rather than in abstract theories, offers readers rare insights from the voices and sometimes piecemeal memories of the students, parents and authorities who lived through those turbulent and momentous days.
 
Contents:

Foreword vii
Preface ix
Notes on contributors xii
List of acronyms xv
Introduction xvii

Chapter 1
Cultural imperialism, language and ideological
struggles inside the Soweto classrooms
By Sifiso Mxolisi Ndlovu 1

Chapter 2
The anatomy of the crowd
By Sifiso Mxolisi Ndlovu 41

Chapter 3
The centrality of public and oral history in
mapping the Soweto uprising routes
By Sifiso Mxolisi Ndlovu and Ali Khangela Hlongwane 79

Chapter 4
The 1976 Soweto students’ uprising and its aftermath
in parts of the Northern Transvaal
By Sekibakiba Peter Lekgoathi 126

Chapter 5
‘Angeke bemhlule umlungu. Umlungu unamandla
(They won’t defeat the whites. Whites are powerful)’1: Students protest
in Mzinoni township, Bethal, 1972−1977
By Tshepo Moloi 143

Chapter 6
June 16 1976 Soweto uprisings: A journey into
the contested world of commemoration
By Ali Khangela Hlongwane 165

Chapter 7
‘Bricks-and-mortar testimonies’: The interactive and
dialogical features of the memorials and
monuments of the June 16 1976 Soweto uprisings
By Ali Khangela Hlongwane 195

Chapter 8
History, memory, tourism and curatorial mediations:
The Hector Pieterson Museum and the representation
of the story of the June 16 1976 Uprisings
By Ali Khangela Hlongwane 227

Select bibliography 251
Index 257

Book details

  • The Road to Democracy Volume 7: Soweto Uprisings: New Perspective, Commemorations and Memorialisati by South African Democracy Education Trust
    EAN: 9781868889082
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Vembe traces the way in which the African oral-story telling tradition survived within the Zimbabwean black novel in English

African Oral Story-telling tradition and the Zimbabwean novel in EnglishThe book traces the ways in which the African oral story-telling tradition survived in several forms within the narrative interstices of the Zimbabwean black novel in English.

The author critically analyses the works of eight well-known Zimbabwean writers and reveals ways in which they use Zimbabwe’s oral story-telling traditions to inform their creative works.

These writers’ work reveals that during colonisation, the liberation struggle and in post-independence Zimbabwe, African orature communicated and continues to communicate views on resistance to authoritarian ideas.

Book details

Significant book on power and identity dynamics in the African context

The book illuminates key aspects of how, historically, the dynamics of power and identity interact in the African context, generating the kind of political structures and collective actions that have often appeared characteristic for the continent.

It examines some salient dimensions of the broader frameworks of hegemony and power imposed upon African societies in the context of larger geopolitical and historical processes. Power and identity are two key concepts which can be applied in describing African realities.

The interaction and connections between the two concepts are, moreover, of key importance in the African context, as their studies demonstrate.

In common with other scholars in this area of study, the authors acknowledge that underlying their work is a compelling fascination with the continent’s evolving social and cultural forms.

Their insight into African social reality reflects a fragile and fragmented continent capable of bringing forth a great variety of agents and actors in the interplay of social and political power: power vested in a variety of groups, ethnicities, religions or classes, with potential to impose on the identity of others.
 
 
Martin Doornbos (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is Emeritus Professor of Political Science at the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, The Netherlands, and Visiting Professor of Development Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda. His research interests have broadly focused on the dynamics of state-society relations in Africa and India, on the institutional dimensions of conflict and collaboration, the politics of resource allocation, and on questions of state collapse and post-conflict reconstruction.

Wim van Binsbergen is an anthropologist, presently working on the theory and method of research on cultural globalisation, especially in connection with virtuality, Information and Communication Technology, ethnicity and religion. His project on ‘Africa’s Contribution to Global Systems of Knowledge: An Epistemology for African Studies in the Twenty-First Century’, provides a link between his research at the ASC and his chair in Foundations of Intercultural Philosophy at Erasmus University, Rotterdam.

Contents:
PART I
INCORPORATION AND POLITICAL PENETRATION 51
Part Introduction 53
1 ‘Big-man’ and his big brother: Some notes on incorporation by Martin Doornbos 59
2 The post-colonial state, ‘state penetration’ and the Nkoya experience in Western Central Zambia by Wim van Binsbergen 71
3 Recurring penetration strategies in East Africa by Martin Doornbos 105
4 Aspects of modern state penetration in Africa by Wim van Binsbergen 125

PART II
ETHNICITY AND IDENTITY: WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? 155
Part introduction 157
5 Some conceptual problems concerning ethnicity in integration analysis by Martin Doornbos 162
6 From tribe to ethnicity in Western Zambia: The unit of study as an ideological problem by Wim van Binsbergen 199
7 Kumanyana and Rwenzururu: Two responses to ethnic inequality in Uganda by Martin Doornbos 261
8 The Kazanga festival: Ethnicity as cultural mediation and transformation in Western Central Zambia by Wim van Binsbergen 329
9 Rwenzururu protest songs by Martin Doornbos and Peter Cooke 385
10 Nkoya royal chiefs and the Kazanga cultural association in Western Central Zambia today: Resilience, decline, or folklorisation? by Wim van Binsbergen 425
11 The Ankole kingship question: Stalemate and Implications by Martin Doornbos 477

PART III
RELIGION AND STATE: AMBIGUOUS RELATIONSHIPS 513
Part introduction 515
12 Fortunes and failures in state formation: Contrasting the jihads of Usman dan Fodio and Mohammed Abdulle Hassan by Martin Doornbos 521
13 Religious innovation and political conflict in Zambia: The Lumpa rising by Wim van Binsbergen 563
14 Church and state in Eastern Africa: Some unresolved questions Martin Doornbos 328
15 African Independent churches and the state in Botswana Wim van Binsbergen 337

PART IV CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL POLITICS 359
Introduction to Part IV 361
16 Form and ideology in first-generation constitutional preambles: Some francophone African examples Martin Doornbos, Wim van Binsbergen & Gerti Hesseling 364
17 Aspects of democracy and democratisation in Zambia and Botswana: Exploring African political culture at the grassroots Wim van Binsbergen 389
18 Enquiring into African statehood, conflict and legitimacy, with particular reference to Somalia and Uganda Martin Doornbos 414

PART V CONCLUSION 431
19 Conclusion

Wim van Binsbergen & Martin Doornbos 433
Notes 448
Cumulative bibliography 482
Index 529

 

Book details

  • Researching Power and Identity in African State Formation: Comparative Perspectives by Martin Doornbos, Wim van Binsbergen
    EAN: 9783643908520
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Multilingual Education for Africa emphasises the most appropriate ways of teaching and using language in multilingual settings

Multilingual Education for Africa: Concepts and PracticesThe common thread in this book is the exploration of innovative pedagogies in language teaching and language use in education. The greatest danger facing educators is one of complacency.

Whether set in Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, South Africa or elsewhere in Africa, all the chapters in this book emphasise the imperative for educators to constantly revise curricula and teaching methods in order to find the most appropriate ways of teaching and using language in multilingual settings.

The chapters in this book place the mother tongue at the centre of learning, while developing the use of exoglossic languages such as English. The book will be of interest to educators at all levels of the education system.

Comprising of 17 chapters, the book is divided into three parts, which addresses the multilingual context of education in Africa, the teaching of additional language in schools, and additional language tuition in higher education.

Everyone interested in comparative education models, language teaching, and language use in multilingual contexts of all cycles of education, will find this book useful.

Prof Russell H. Kaschula is the NRF SARChI Chair: Intellectualisation of African Languages, Multilingualism and Education, School of Languages & Literatures (African Language Studies Section), Rhodes University.

Prof H. Ekkehard Wolff, Universität Leipzig, is Visiting Professor to the NRF SARChI Chair: Intellectualisation of African Languages, Multilingualism and Education, School of Languages & Literatures (African Language Studies Section), Rhodes University.

Dedicated to the memory of Neville Alexander, the book opens with a tribute to this South African who was directly engaged in advocacy around issues of language, multilingualism and literacy.

Contents:
Dedication: A tribute to Neville Alexander
PART 1: THE MULTILINGUAL CONTEXT OF EDUCATION IN AFRICA
Chapter 1: Introduction – The multilingual context of education in Africa
Chapter 2: Teaching isiZulu as an additional language
Chapter 3: Developing reading literacy in an L2 learning environment
Chapter 4: Teaching mathematics to isiXhosa-speaking students through Afrikaans
Chapter 5: IsiNdebele and minority languages in education in Zimbabwe
Chapter 6: The teaching and learning of African languages at South African universities
PART 2: TEACHING ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE IN SCHOOLS
Chapter 7: Children’s dictionaries
Chapter 8: Improving educational practice
Chapter 9: The language of instruction at early childhood development level
Chapter 10: The impact of pupils’ background and school context
PART 3: USING ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Chapter 11: Piloting Oromo-English bilingual teaching at tertiary level
Chapter 12: Additional English at tertiary level
Chapter 13: A multilingual approach to teaching South African History
Chapter 14: IsiZulu at the University of KwaZulu-Natal
Chapter 15: Afrikaans communication skills for Mauritian medical students
Chapter 16: Additional language in secondary and tertiary education
Chapter 17: Designing a vocational English curriculum

Book details

Significant book on the dynamics of power and identity in the African context to be published in June

The book illuminates key aspects of how, historically, the dynamics of power and identity interact in the African context, generating the kind of political structures and collective actions that have often appeared characteristic for the continent. It examines some salient dimensions of the broader frameworks of hegemony and power imposed upon African societies in the context of larger geopolitical and historical processes. Power and identity are two key concepts which can be applied in describing African realities. The interaction and connections between the two concepts are, moreover, of key importance in the African context, as their studies demonstrate.

In common with other scholars in this area of study, the authors acknowledge that underlying their work is a compelling fascination with the continent’s evolving social and cultural forms. Their insight into African social reality reflects a fragile and fragmented continent capable of bringing forth a great variety of agents and actors in the interplay of social and political power: power vested in a variety of groups, ethnicities, religions or classes, with potential to impose on the identity of others.

About the authors
Martin Doornbos (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is Emeritus Professor of Political Science at the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, The Netherlands, and Visiting Professor of Development Studies, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda. His research interests have broadly focused on the dynamics of state-society relations in Africa and India, on the institutional dimensions of conflict and collaboration, the politics of resource allocation, and on questions of state collapse and post-conflict reconstruction.

Wim van Binsbergen is an anthropologist, presently working on the theory and method of research on cultural globalisation, especially in connection with virtuality, Information and Communication Technology, ethnicity and religion. His project on ‘Africa’s Contribution to Global Systems of Knowledge: An Epistemology for African Studies in the Twenty-First Century’, provides a link between his research at the ASC and his chair in Foundations of Intercultural Philosophy at Erasmus University, Rotterdam.

Contents:
PART I
INCORPORATION AND POLITICAL PENETRATION 51
Part Introduction 53
1 ‘Big-man’ and his big brother: Some notes on incorporation by Martin Doornbos 59
2 The post-colonial state, ‘state penetration’ and the Nkoya experience in Western Central Zambia by Wim van Binsbergen 71
3 Recurring penetration strategies in East Africa by Martin Doornbos 105
4 Aspects of modern state penetration in Africa by Wim van Binsbergen 125

PART II
ETHNICITY AND IDENTITY: WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? 155
Part introduction 157
5 Some conceptual problems concerning ethnicity in integration analysis by Martin Doornbos 162
6 From tribe to ethnicity in Western Zambia: The unit of study as an ideological problem by Wim van Binsbergen 199
7 Kumanyana and Rwenzururu: Two responses to ethnic inequality in Uganda by Martin Doornbos 261
8 The Kazanga festival: Ethnicity as cultural mediation and transformation in Western Central Zambia by Wim van Binsbergen 329
9 Rwenzururu protest songs by Martin Doornbos and Peter Cooke 385
10 Nkoya royal chiefs and the Kazanga cultural association in Western Central Zambia today: Resilience, decline, or folklorisation? by Wim van Binsbergen 425
11 The Ankole kingship question: Stalemate and Implications by Martin Doornbos 477

PART III
RELIGION AND STATE: AMBIGUOUS RELATIONSHIPS 513
Part introduction 515
12 Fortunes and failures in state formation: Contrasting the jihads of Usman dan Fodio and Mohammed Abdulle Hassan by Martin Doornbos 521
13 Religious innovation and political conflict in Zambia: The Lumpa rising by Wim van Binsbergen 563
14 Church and state in Eastern Africa: Some unresolved questions Martin Doornbos 328
15 African Independent churches and the state in Botswana Wim van Binsbergen 337

PART IV CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL POLITICS 359
Introduction to Part IV 361
16 Form and ideology in first-generation constitutional preambles: Some francophone African examples Martin Doornbos, Wim van Binsbergen & Gerti Hesseling 364
17 Aspects of democracy and democratisation in Zambia and Botswana: Exploring African political culture at the grassroots Wim van Binsbergen 389
18 Enquiring into African statehood, conflict and legitimacy, with particular reference to Somalia and Uganda Martin Doornbos 414

PART V CONCLUSION 431
19 Conclusion

Wim van Binsbergen & Martin Doornbos 433
Notes 448
Cumulative bibliography 482
Index 529

 

Book details

  • Researching Power and Identity in African State Formation: Comparative Perspectives by Martin Doornbos, Wim van Binsbergen
    EAN: 9783643908520
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Chris Swanepoel se Afrikaanse vertaling van Thomas Mofolo se Chaka op die vlak van ’n literêre epos

In Chaka word die geboorte, opgang en val van die historiese Shaka slegs as vertrekpunt gebruik. Die werk vertoon konneksies met verskeie mondelinge en literêre genres soos die volksverhaal, legende, fabel, sage, fantasie en selfs mite. Daar is ook allegoriese kenmerke. Sy stilistiese grootsheid, poëtiese prosa, historiese basis met vermenging van fiktiewe elemente en karakters, die idealisering van Shaka se krygsvernuf, die heroїsering, is kenmerke wat die werk waarskynlik op die vlak van ‘n literêre epos plaas.
 
Chaka se oorwinning oor die onregverdige behandeling wat hom in sy jeug te beurt geval het – gedeeltelik as gevolg van sy buite-egtelike verwekking – en sy vordering tot magtige heerser oor die grootste gedeelte van Suider-Afrika, word in die roman aangebied as ‘n direkte gevolg van die intervensie van bonatuurlike magte wat hom dapper en bloeddorstig gemaak het: eers deur die vrouedokter van Bungane en daarna deur die invloedryke tradisionele geestelike Isanusi en sy kornuite Malunga en Ndlebe – wat almal briljant gekarakteriseer word.
 
Chaka eindig met die AmaZulu wat nadink oor die tragedie wat hulle leier te beurt geval het en sê: “Di a bela, di a hlweba! Madiba ho pjha a maholo!” (Dit kook en skif! Selfs die groot ryke kom tot ‘n val!).

Chaka: die nuwe Afrikaanse vertalingBook details

 
 

Chaka

A regional perspective on the ANC’s 100-year-plus history: Khongolose by Andrew Manson, Bernard Mbenga and Arianna Lissoni

KhongoloseUnisa Press is proud to present Khongolose: A Short History of the ANC in the North West Province from 1909 by Andrew Manson, Bernard Mbenga and Arianna Lissoni:

This publication offers a regional perspective on the ANC’s over 100-year history.

Many accounts of the ANC have focused predominantly on national or urban issues and developments often to the detriment of the periphery. The book focuses on South Africa’s North-West Province, a mainly rural and less well understood, but nonetheless extremely vital, area of the ANC’s activities and strategies in its wider national liberation history.

Written by authors well versed in the province’s political background, this account sheds light on people and events that have not figured so centrally in previous histories of the ANC. In so doing, it both increments our knowledge and appreciation of the organisation’s quest for a politically free South Africa, and provides a legacy to which others may aspire.

About the authors

Andrew Manson is currently a Research Fellow in the Department of History at the University of South Africa. Formerly, he was Professor of History and later a Research Professor at the North-West University from where he retired in 2014.

Bernard Mbenga is a Professor of History at the North-West University, Mafikeng campus. His recent publications, variously co-authored or co-edited with historians including Hermann Giliomee, Andrew Manson, Carolyn Hamilton and Robert Ross, include “‘People of the Dew’: The Bafokeng of the Phokeng-Rustenburg district of South Africa”; The Cambridge History of South Africa. Vol 1. From early times to 1885; and Land, chiefs, mining: South Africa’s North West Province since 1840.

Arianna Lissoni is a researcher in the History Workshop at the University of the Witwatersrand. She is one of the editors of the South African Historical Journal and co-editor of the book One Hundred Years of the ANC (Wits University Press, 2012).

Book details

  • Khongolose: A Short History of the ANC in the North West Province from 1909 by Andrew Manson, Bernard Mbenga and Arianna Lissoni
    EAN: 9781868888078
    Contact Unisa Press for more information:
    Laetitia Theart
    Email: unisa-press@unisa.ac.za
    Tel: 012 429 3448

Irikidzayi Manase examines the land question in Zimbabwean literature

White NarrativesIrikidzayi Manase is the author of the newly released White Narratives: The depiction of post-2000 land invasions in Zimbabwe.

Manase, who teaches in the Department of English at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein Campus, is interested in how the land issue has been handled in post-2000 Zimbabwe narratives and fiction.

In 2014, while at the University of Venda, Manase wrote an article for Tydskrif vir Letterkunde titled “Lawrence Hoba’s depiction of the post-2000 Zimbabwean land invasions in The Trek and Other Stories”.

The article is available to read online.

The extract:

The article examines Lawrence Hoba’s The Trek and Other Stories (2009), which describes experiences from the post-2000 land invasions and fast-track land reform in Zimbabwe. It analyses selected short stories in relation to other Zimbabwean fictional works about land and the definition and restoration of dignified and other identities lost during Rhodesian colonialism. The article also discusses the significance of the narrative style, especially satire, and some of the themes, such as violence, dislocation, the position of women during the land reform and the multiple migration patterns in the land invasions, in an effort to foreground how all these link with Hoba’s cynicism and, at times, subversive perceptions on how the land issue has been handled in post-2000 Zimbabwe. The argument here is that Hoba’s fictional writings about the post-2000 land invasions and fast track land redistribution programme are reflective of a marked departure from the pro-nationalist, ideological and backward looking fictional mappings of land and national belonging. These writings place the ‘now’ as critical in unpacking the ironies and contradictory impact of the land redistribution exercise on ordinary Zimbabweans.

Book details

New from Irikidzayi Manase and Unisa Press – White Narratives: The depiction of post-2000 land invasions in Zimbabwe

White NarrativesNew from Unisa Press – White Narratives: The depiction of post-2000 land invasions in Zimbabwe by Irikidzayi Manase:

The post-2000 period in Zimbabwe saw the launch of a fast-track land reform programme, resulting in a flurry of accounts from white Zimbabweans about how they saw the land, the land invasions, and their own sense of belonging and identity.

In White Narratives, Manase engages with this fervent output of texts seeking definition of experiences, conflicts and ambiguities arising from the land invasions. He takes us through his study of texts selected from the memoirs, fictional and non-fictional accounts of white farmers and other displaced white narrators on the post-2000 Zimbabwe land invasions, scrutinising divisions between white and black in terms of both current and historical ideology, society and spatial relationships.

Manase examines how the revisionist politics of the Zimbabwean government influenced the politics of identities and race categories during the period 2000-2008, and posits some solutions to the contestations for land and belonging.

About the author

Irikidzayi Manase teaches in the Department of English at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein Campus. His areas of research fall within the broader area of literary cultural geographic studies of South Africa, Zimbabwe, Southern Africa and Africa. He has read papers at both local and international conferences and published on: Imaginaries about and urban youth cultures of Johannesburg, Harare and South Africa’s Limpopo Province; the human condition and mapping of spaces in South African science fiction and speculative literature; transnational African migrant experiences; and literatures about the constitution of senses of self and belonging in relation to the land issue and crisis conditions in post-2000 Zimbabwe.

Book details

  • White Narratives: The depiction of post-2000 land invasions in Zimbabwe by Irikidzayi Manase
    EAN: 9781868888252
    Contact Unisa Press for more information:
    Laetitia Theart
    Email: unisa-press@unisa.ac.za
    Tel: 012 429 3448